Posts Tagged With: fast food

Retiring the modern hearth: Good bye to the stove

Janine Swank. Flickr. Sonora Town, Gilbert, Arizona. August 1, 2011.

Janine Swank. Flickr. Sonora Town, Gilbert, Arizona. August 1, 2011.

Shiny, warm, and fragrant from baking chocolate chip cookies, the stove replaced the hearth as the center of the kitchen if not the home.  It is lovingly scrubbed by fryers of chicken and simmerers of tomato sauce.  Novice bakers of muffins for a Girl Scout meeting, veteran omelet cooks, and amateur gourmet chefs preparing ratatouille all pay their respects with their attentive stances before the stove.  Of course, these comforting household routines would not be possible if the presence of the stove wasn’t an expected part of every household.  Despite central heating and fast food restaurants, whether we inhabit an apartment or a mansion, there’s a stove in the kitchen.

Given the length and importance of the relationship of the stove with abodes and their inhabitants, what is the future of the stove?  Fast food meals have enabled walks right by the kitchen door.  Digital relationships have moved eating from the kitchen to the desktop.  Our working friendship with the stove has been usurped by the computer.  Cooking and baking have been replaced by tapping and clicking.  While the stove’s stolid appearance has a certain technological charm, its chunky mechanical dials and elements can’t complete even visually with the sleek, minimalist style of a laptop computer.  Of course, working with a computer imbues us with an air of intelligent accomplishment, too.  The audios, videos, and multiple screens are all commanded by the agile glide of our fingers over the keyboard.  Melodious sounds and erudite talk issue into the surrounding air.  Working with stove affords us a more visceral appeal.  Our production of nourishment, warmth, and taste suggests that not only our minds, but also our hearts are engaged.

Despite our longings, though, the demands of the information age will draw us away from the loyal companionship of the stove.  Our collection of cookbooks will make way for the overflow of paper goods from the wholesale shopping store.  Repeated foraging for meals at the drive through window will become habitual.  Our memories of cooking and the flavors of home cooked meals will disappear with our bottled herbs and spices.  Like the exercise bike that serves as a hanger for clothing, the stove will first lose its luster due to a slight covering of dust.  Our initial inattentions will be replaced with takeout menus, piles of paper napkins, and packets of sugar and ketchup.  Eventually, it will be donated to a family who appreciates its bulky sensibilities, despite its lack of cachet.  Future generations will want kitchens equipped only with microwave and toaster ovens.  Their elegant portability and just-in-time performance will speed the stove into obsolescence.  Good bye, old friend.

© Laura Rizzardini, Inc., 2013

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Chowing down: Fast as a way of life

Derek Steen. Flickr. January 17, 2011.

Derek Steen. Flickr. January 17, 2011.

Fortification for the demands of the day is economically, geographically, and nearly instantaneously available to Americans.  There are toastable frozen waffles, packaged breakfast bars, or yogurt cups from one’s own kitchen refrigerator.  Drive-through windows at local restaurants offer complete and handheld breakfasts.  Even if purchased, not cooked oneself, the substance of bacon, eggs, and toast used to require a fork, knife, and plate.  The preparation of even popular, comfort foods has become the province of people who are formally educated and paid.  The rhythms of a lovingly handmade, hot breakfast enjoyed in a warm kitchen in the convivial company of loved ones are gone.  Americans are so enamored with mass production that the value of amateur proficiency in the kitchen has declined precipitously.  Slowly preparing meals from fresh ingredients and family recipes has little meaning.

Still, how is it that fast preparation requires fast consumption of meals?  Eating while driving, working, and watching television is an expected part of multi-tasking for Americans.   Sandwiches, pizza, doughnuts, fried chicken, and burritos can be dispatched by the mouthful, too.  They constitute a handful; a double cheeseburger or a beef burrito dwarf finger sandwiches in size and weight.  Energetic chewing may be required, but table manners needn’t stand in its way.  Neither a dining table nor dining companions are found in a car, office, or den.  Large chunks of food are readily swallowed with the help of large volumes of beverages.  Straws encourage gulps rather than sips.  It isn’t enough for food to be fast, so must the diner.  The goal is to assuage hunger and finish a meal; minimizing the time spent eating is as important as minimizing the time spent cooking and cleaning up after the meal.

That doughnut or fried chicken leg need not be memorable as long as it is edible.  This minimal standard for taste enables the purchase of doughnuts or chicken legs at any restaurant.  For Americans, a valuable meal has become more food or drink per dollar.  Fast food restaurants compete by lowering prices or increasing portions rather than by improving taste or nutrition.  Their customers seek savings in time, effort, and money rather than enjoyment of their meals and the companionship of family and friends.  Changing these values would dramatically change not only the American diet and physique, but also the American identity and way of life.  Race you to the grocery store?

© Laura Rizzardini, Inc., 2013

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At a museum near you: Vintage foods

Clare Chandler. Flickr. January 2, 2012.

Clare Chandler. Flickr. January 2, 2012.

The era of sauerkraut and sausages, rice and beans, pasta and tomato sauce, and turnips and potatoes is behind us.  For those of us on a budget, the dollar menu at McDonald’s is not only as economical, but also efficient and labor-saving.  The time from stomach growling to dinner time is approaching equivalence to the time required to say, “Millions served”.  When was the last time you ate pickled beets, cream of rice cereal, or beef tongue?  Molasses and prunes are now worthy of a museum exhibit.  They used to constitute important ingredients for cookies and cakes.  Ginger cookies, spice cake, and prune Danish pastries rendered the consumption of iron and fiber not only painless but also sweet.

Now that Hostess has stopped creating rich variations in the color and texture of sugary snacks, will people revert to canned fruit cocktail, toaster pastries, peaches in heavy syrup, and frozen cookie dough?  Their sweetness and convenience offered a surfeit of taste and expedient satiation.  Their popularity is now rivaled by hamburger, chicken parts, and cheddar cheese.  Given the great variety of foods available due to mass transportation and global trade, why are Americans satisfied with such a repetitive diet?  Fast food and family restaurants serving burgers, cheese burgers, macaroni and cheese, pizza, beef and cheese tacos, barbecued chicken, and chicken wings densely populate many communities.

What happened to pancake houses, delicatessens, and fish shacks?  Blueberry waffles, pastrami sandwiches, and fried clams offer the aromas and flavors of regional and ethnic America.  The preservation of tradition and variety requires experimentation.  Kippers for breakfast would wake up American taste buds.  Boredom would be banished by sushi or chorizo for lunch.  A supper of goulash, kimchi fried rice, or a prosciutto frittata would require dinner time conversation.  Heirloom status should be awarded to recipes, not just tomatoes, cucumbers, and sweet potatoes.

© Laura Rizzardini, Inc., 2013

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